What a drag

The cruising guides caution that the holding in Pago Pago harbor is not very good. After a day and a half of heavy rain we were hit by strong gusty winds to about 30 knots. The result is that about 7 boats dragged. (We did not really get a chance to drag as we raised anchor and ran away! The advantage of not single handing. Of course standing on the bow in heavy rain is not the most fun. We reset away from the action.)

Just when we thought it was over we got a call on the radio. "Reboot, xxx is dragging and they have fouled yyy's anchor. They are dragging them across the mooring field. Can you hop in your dinghy and help out?" The dinghy is half full of rain water and the outboard doesn't like to run in the wet until it has warmed up but off Matt and I go to the scene of the crime. Someone had run a line between yyy and xxx so xxx was dragging both boats up to the very large and occupied mooring buoy. We got xxx tied to the buoy, rafted it up to the previous occupant and checked on yyy. With no one on board but the anchor down and a line daisy chained to the mooring ball we decided to leave well enough alone. (It will be interesting when the owners return as their boat has moved about 600 yards!)

Back to Reboot. We are sitting in the cockpit watching when we hear another radio call. "I am dragging and my engine will not shift into gear." Fortunately several other boats responded so we are still on Reboot monitoring the situation.

What a drag!

Fair winds and following seas :)

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